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Making Extra Money

“Becoming a Money Magnet”

Making and saving money are usually a college student’s favorite dream and worst nightmare. I don’t believe I need to distinguish which one is which.

Believe it or not, making extra money isn’t that difficult; however, keeping it is another story. For now, we’ll just focus on making it.

John D. Rockefeller once said that the only difference between a rich person and a poor person is how each DECIDES to spend his or her time.
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Counting Your Blessings

A Student Writes:

I have learned a very important lesson this past year. In March of last year my father lost his leg in an accident at work. My family and I were devastated. My father loved his job, and was a very active man. He was not the type of person who could just sit inside and do nothing. As a result of my father’s disability, my family had to get used to living off a third (1/3) of the income we were used to. My mom couldn’t work because she had to constantly bring my father to doctors, hospitals, etc.
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Learning From Other Peoples’ Success

Normally, I don’t share what I’ve written to students in my class with others, but in this particular case, I thought my response to this particular student could potentially help many others.

The scenario is this: I gave my students a semester-long project in which they had to 1.) identify their passion, and 2.) then interview three professionals who were working in that field. Then they were asked to type a two-page paper about what they learned as a result of the experience. The professionals selected could either be pursuing the field, currently working in the field, or retired from the field. The only stipulation would be that the person interviewed had to be passionate about his or her work.

Well, this particular student not only failed to complete the assignment, but he decided to turn in a three-page (typed) paper on why he thought the project was flawed. I gave him half-credit for at least turning in something, but I attached the following letter in response to his paper. By reading my response to him, I hope you’re able to garner some wisdom along your search for “purpose” and meaning in your own career pursuits. I left out his name to protect the guilty.
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Trying to Stay Positive

A RealWorld Student writes:

I HAVE THIS TEST TO TAKE IN ABOUT 51 DAYS, I HAVE BEEN PREPARING FOR THIS EXAM FOR ABOUT 9 MONTHS AND I HAVE TO ACE IT , SOMETIMES I HAVE SELF DOUBTS ABOUT MY CAPABILITIES WHICH I ALWAYS TRY TO SAY MYSELF THAT IT IS BY BEING SUCCESSFULL IN THE PRESENT THAT YOU CAN EXPECT A POSITIVE FUTURE. I JUST WANTED TO KNOW HOW AM I SUPPOSE TO BE POSITIVELY MOTIVATED AND ACTIVE IN MOST OF MY PREPARATION.

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More Things College Students Should Know

The first day of classes, I found myself in the same situation that thousand of college students face each semester. Being the first person in my family to attend college, I had no idea what to expect. Making the decision not to leave home and to attend school in my hometown helped to make the transition easier, but it was still intimidating.

If I had someone to clue me in on what to expect, things might have been easier and I could have concentrated more on my classes instead of fumbling through everything. Tips on the best parking lots, when to use the computer lab, and which professors to avoid, would have been the best things that anyone could have told me about. Unfortunately, nobody did, and I have racked up several parking tickets, waited impatiently for a chance in the computer lab, and have had my share of longwinded professors. The following are a few more things that I had no idea about.
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Facing Your Fears

Some have said that the letters of the word “fear” also defines what it is: “False Evidence Appearing Real.” How appropriate, because that’s exactly what it is. Most of the time, fear is just a manifestation of our imagination running out of control.

Fear, especially for college students, comes disguised in many forms.

There’s the typical fear of the unknown (i.e., outlook on employment after graduation, having to speak in front of your peers, uncertainty about meeting your financial needs, etc.).

Then there’s the fear of failure or rejection (i.e., failing your final exam, not graduating, not getting the job you want, etc.).

There’s also the uncommon fear of success. That right; believe it or not, some people are actually afraid to succeed (i.e., increased expectations, increased responsibility, feelings of guilt for having more than others, etc.).

All of these examples don’t even take into account the fear we have in our relationships, families, and personal lives.

Whichever your fear, neither one of the three previous types is healthy for you. Each fear has its own unique debilitating characteristics that can steal your dreams and sabotage your future. Your job is to identify which and how each fear is attacking you and learn how to conquer it effectively.

Now I don’t pretend to be an expert on the topic, but I have endured my own share of fear attacks. In fact, when I was a teenager growing up in the ghetto, sometimes it felt as if “fear” was the only friend I had. Over the years, I’ve achieved some “success” largely due to my ability to courageously face my fears. During those battles, I learned the following lessons:
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